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Sisters of St Joseph of Carondelet - Carondelet Center - 11999 Chalon Road - Los Angeles, CA 90049  310.889.2100

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Justice & Peace

Our congregation from its foundation has been dedicated to the exercise of “all of the spiritual and corporal works of mercy of which woman is capable and which will most benefit the dear neighbor”

We do this in a way that:

  • Heals and reconciles
  • Serves all persons without distinction
  • Makes known through our lives the gospel we proclaim
  • Enables others to assume a more active responsibility for continuing the mission of Jesus
  • Recognizes and defends the human dignity of all persons
  • Promotes justice with particular concern for the poor

As a Congregation, we commit ourselves to act collectively when justice demands it, especially when our corporate power could significantly influence an issue.

Diane Smith, CSJ Justice Coordinator

Diane Smith, CSJ
Justice Coordinator

Click image above for an archive of our updates

Click image above for an archive of our updates






We believe that Creation is a sacred trust given to the whole Earth Community.  Therefore we commit ourselves to act with urgency to protect her stability and  integrity and to celebrate her beauty wherever we are. (Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Congregational Chapter’s Calls to Action 2013 page 8)

Sisters of St Joseph Federation in the United States

2010 Statement on Climate Change2012 Federation Statement on Climate Change

Pope Francis called on all men and women of good will to fight for the abolishment of the death penalty in “all of its forms” and for the improvement of prison conditions.

(Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Congregational Chapter’s Calls to Action 2013 page 10)

Corporate Stands

Corporate stand on the Death PenaltyPublic Statement on the Death Penalty

federation-logo

The Federation of the Sisters of Saint Joseph is a dynamic union of all the Sisters of Saint Joseph of the United States who claim a common origin in the foundation at Le Puy, France in 1650. This includes 4,939 sisters, 2,972 associates and 11 agrégées of 16 Congregations throughout the United States. The Federation moves us to greater consciousness of our kinship in grace and calls us to fidelity to that grace. Together we strive to embody a vision of all people united in one earth community of love and unity. We do this through collaborative programs, interaction, prayer and ministry. In our conflicted 21st century world, the Sisters of Saint Joseph seek to bring our traditions and vision to life in a way that will speak to our contemporary society and be a positive influence for change.

For more information of Peace and Justice click here.

“All of us are called (by God) to be free, all are called to be sons and daughters, and each, according to his or her responsibilities, is called to combat modern forms of enslavement.”
(Pope Francis in his first Mass of 2015 at St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican

Symposium 2016

Mount St Mary’s University
Doheny Campus
March 5, 2016

More information can be found on our calendar

Human Traff

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We shall always insist upon giving a generous welcome to others which is at once a duty of human solidarity and Christian charity. . . . [They should be] welcomed with brotherly love, [with] examples of upright living in which genuine and effective Christian charity and the highest spiritual values are esteemed.

(Paul VI, Populorum Progressio: On the Development of Peoples (March 26, 1967), no. 67)

In the Old Testament, the Torah teaches that strangers and the homeless in general, inasmuch as they are exposed to all sorts of dangers, deserve special concern from the believer. Indeed, God clearly and repeatedly recommends hospitality and generosity toward the stranger . . . , reminding Israel of how precarious its own existence had once been.

(John Paul II, Developing Special Concern for the Homeless, Origins 26:30 (January 16, 1997): p. 495)

In order to build the civilization of love, dialogue between cultures must work to overcome all ethnocentric selfishness and make it possible to combine regard for one’s own identity with understanding of others and respect for diversity.

(John Paul II, World Day for Peace Message, January 1, 2001)

This atmosphere of welcoming is increasingly necessary in confronting today’s diverse forms of distancing ourselves from others. This is profoundly evidenced in the problem of millions of refugees and exiles, in the phenomenon of racial intolerance as well as intolerance toward the person whose only “fault” is a search for work and better living conditions outside his own country, and in the fear of all who are different and thus seen as a threat.

(John Paul II, Welcoming the Poor: Reigniting Hope, Origins 27:36 (February 26, 1998): p. 605

Our common dignity as human beings calls us to respect the alien among us, regardless of their status or social position. A preferential love for the poor and disenfranchised is a sure sign of one’s Christian identity.

(Most Rev. Robert N. Lynch, Bishop of St. Petersburg, Fla.,)

2012 Immigration StatementStatement on MigrationFederation of Sisters of St Joseph statement on Immigration

Human life is sacred. The dignity of the human person is the foundation of a moral vision for society. Direct attacks on innocent persons are never morally acceptable, at any stage or in any condition. In our society, human life is especially under direct attack from abortion. Other direct threats to the sanctity of human life include euthanasia, human cloning, and the destruction of human embryos for research.

(Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship # 44 from the United States conference of Bishops)

Catholic teaching about the dignity of life calls us to oppose torture, unjust war, and the use of the death penalty; to prevent genocide and attacks against noncombatants; to oppose racism; and to overcome poverty and suffering. Nations are called to protect the right to life by seeking effective ways to combat evil and terror without resorting to armed conflicts except as a last resort, always seeking first to resolve disputes by peaceful means. We revere the lives of children in the womb, the lives of persons dying in war and from starvation, and indeed the lives of all human beings as children of God.

(Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship # 45 from the United States conference of Bishops)

Join with others in addressing issues that demean or deny people their human dignity and that force those who are marginalized to bear the burden of unjust systems.

(Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Congregational Chapter’s Calls to Action 2013 page 10)

While the common good embraces all, those who are weak, vulnerable, and most in need deserve preferential concern. A basic moral test for our society is how we treat the most vulnerable in our midst. In a society marred by deepening disparities between rich and poor, Scripture gives us the story of the Last Judgment (see Mt 25:31-46) and reminds us that we will be judged by our response to the “least among us.”

(Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship # 50 from the United States conference of Bishops)

The Catechism of the Catholic Church explains:
Those who are oppressed by poverty are the object of a preferential love on the part of the Church which, since her origin and in spite of the failings of many of her members, has not ceased to work for their relief, defense, and liberation through numerous works of charity which remain indispensable always and everywhere. (no. 2448)

Sustainable Development Goals
The sustainable development goals (SDGs) are a new, universal set of goals, targets and indicators that UN member states will be expected to use to frame their agendas and political policies over the next 15 years. The SDGs follow and expand on the millennium development goals (MDGs), which were agreed by governments in 2001 and are due to expire at the end of this year. Goal 1 of the Seventeen SDGs is:

Goal 1
No Poverty In All Its Forms Everywhere

Targets for this goal:
1.1 By 2030, eradicate extreme poverty for all people everywhere, currently measured as people living on less than $1.25 a day
1.2 By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions
1.3 Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable
1.4 By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including microfinance
1.5 By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters
1.a Ensure significant mobilization of resources from a variety of sources, including through enhanced development cooperation, in order to provide adequate and predictable means for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, to implement programmes and policies to end poverty in all its dimensions
1.b Create sound policy frameworks at the national, regional and international levels, based on pro-poor and gender-sensitive development strategies, to support accelerated investment in poverty eradication actions

We believe that mutuality can only happen when we:

Acknowledge and deepen our understanding of our privilege, our racism . . .
Join with others in addressing issues that demean or deny people their human dignity . . .

(Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Congregational Chapter’s Calls to Action 2013 page 10)

In 2010, the United Nations General Assembly recognized that water and sanitation should be a human right. Water as a human right is as much about the quality, making sure that the water is clean and you do not get sick from drinking it, as it is about access.

Sustainable Development Goals
The sustainable development goals (SDGs) are a new, universal set of goals, targets and indicators that UN member states will be expected to use to frame their agendas and political policies over the next 15 years. The SDGs follow and expand on the millennium development goals (MDGs), which were agreed by governments in 2001 and are due to expire at the end of this year. Goal 6 of the Seventeen SDGs is:

GOAL 6
ENSURE AVAILABILITY AND SUSTANABLE MANAGEMENT OF WATER AND SANITATION FOR ALL

TARGETS

6.1
By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all

6.2
By 2030, achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations

6.3
By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally

6.4
By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity

6.5
By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate

6.6
By 2020, protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers and lakes

6.a
By 2030, expand international cooperation and capacity-building support to developing countries in water- and sanitation-related activities and programmes, including water harvesting, desalination, water efficiency, wastewater treatment, recycling and reuse technologies

6.b
Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management